mapsworldwide blog

We are an online specialist map retailer based in the United Kingdom, supplying maps, travel guides & nautical charts worldwide.

Featured Image -- 2433


Leave a comment

St. Andrew Undershaft ~ a survivor of the Great Fire & Blitz


joyofmaps:

Another glimpse into London life and history

Originally posted on London Unveiled:

ST Andrews Undershaft 1

Located in the heart of London’s financial centre, next to the Lloyds Building and towered over by the Gherkin, is St. Andrew Undershaft.  This church is easily lost among the iconic architecture that surrounds it and thus often goes unnoticed.  Yet as one of only a few complete medieval churches in London, this Gothic building is worth a visit.

St Andrew interior

Undershaft:  Before the advent of addresses, places were often given descriptive names to assist people in finding them.  But with one of the more unusual church names in London, the natural question is why ‘undershaft’?  In the early 1500s a massive maypole stood on the land adjacent to the church.  This giant pole, or shaft, was likely taller than the church, which lead to the expression ‘undershaft’ being added as a descriptive to St. Andrew’s church.  For more history on maypoles click here.  The maypole was erected annually in…

View original 544 more words

5 Things that make Babylonstoren Enchanting

Leave a comment


joyofmaps:

are you allowed to sample the fruits as your walk around?

Originally posted on Janaline's world journey:

Cant wait to explore BabylonstorenCant wait to explore Babylonstoren

A perfect summers day is spending a couple of hours walking through the extensive gardens or Babylonstoren and ending it with a delicious winetasting session or with lunch at the Babylonstoren glasshouse. Babylonstoren is a Cape Dutch farm in the Western Cape with vineyards and orchards surrounded by the beautiful mountains of the Drakenstein Valley. The Babylonstoren garden is at the heart of this wine farm. It was inspired by the Company Gardens of the Cape, where for centuries ships would replenish with sweet water, vegetables and fruit at the halfway station between Europe and Asia.

This formal garden spanning eight acres has numerous things that make it a unique and enchanting place to explore.

Planning our route at the Farm restaurantPlanning our route at the Farm restaurant

  1. Every one of over 300 varieties of plants in the garden is edible and it is grown as biologically as they can. A…

View original 387 more words

This gallery contains 11 photos


Leave a comment

The Canadian Rockies, Day 3: Moraine Lake, Saddleback Pass & Takakkaw Falls


Originally posted on Lightscapes Nature Photography Blog:

In the aftermath of a disappointing day at Lake O’Hara, I had hopes for better luck on Day 3.  My plan was to shoot sunrise at Moraine Lake, about a 20-25 minute drive from where I was staying at Lake Louise Village.  The forecast was for mostly cloudy conditions, but I was hoping that I’d get lucky.  As I made the drive, in the dark, down the winding Moraine Lake Road, I could see no stars when I glanced out the window.  As a result, I expected no sunrise this morning.

There was some ambient light when I reached Moraine Lake itself, and because of the time I took to scout the location on Day 1 , I immediately headed to a spot along the lake shore, rather than climbing up to the rock pile, as many photographers automatically do.  The sky was indeed mostly cloudy, but there was…

View original 1,387 more words


Leave a comment

North Devon


IMG_3391Last week I had the opportunity for a few days in my favourite location on the North Devon coast, Lee Abbey, just outside Lynton.  This place is described by many, including me as their spiritual home! With its own beach and fabulous walks in the woods, the estate is a place of rest and escape from the frenetic life that I lead the rest of the time, and the time of reflection in the house was ideal for a period of time to grow closer to God.

IMG_3428

I took these photos on my walks around the estate, unfortunately, the weather was grey and overcast most of the time I was there so these images may not do justice to the beauty of the area.

IMG_3420

I loved the corkscrew growth of these trees silhouetted against the sea.

IMG_3415And finally looking toward the Valley of the Rocks from amongst the trees!

African Crafts in the Harbour

Leave a comment


joyofmaps:

Colourful African crafts!

Originally posted on Janaline's world journey:

African Crafts in the HarbourAfrican Crafts in the Harbour

Hout Bay, nestled between the mountains and the ocean, is where crafters come to ply their trade. It is also here that most seal or shark spotting cruises leave so its the ideal spot to trade to tourists.

As I walked through this craft market it was hard to believe that I was only a 20 minute drive away from the Cape Town city centre.

This craft market has a wide range of African art and curios including pottery and wire crafts, woodwork and even painted ostrich eggs. I was quite surprised to see that it has little in the way of South African art. Most of the art and crafts in this market is either made in Zimbabwe, Lesotho or some other African country. Though the art is beautiful, it is just sad to think that our own local artists lose out in this…

View original 174 more words

This gallery contains 4 photos


Leave a comment

Guest Post – 6 Reasons Why Venice Carnival is The Most Unique Festival in the World


Originally posted on Journey Around The Globe:

Come February, dreamy Venice will shed off its winter blues and become one of the happiest cities in the world. The much awaited Venice Carnival which is by far the best festival in Venice is set to take place in early February and as usual, it promises to be an event that cannot be missed.

Venice Carnival Venice Carnival

The Venice Carnival is all about letting go of you and abandoning all worries at play.You will be transported to whimsical, renaissance times with pompous costumes and gorgeous, handcrafted masks. The Venice Carnival showcases magnificently bespoke masks and costumes, all made especially for this occasion.  The carnival has its roots in the Renaissance period and was originally started as a celebration of victory in a battle in the year 1162. Since then, this baroque celebration has added grace to the prestigious image of Venice.Looking for a reason to plan a trip to Venice…

View original 634 more words

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 336 other followers